Research

The Law, Disability & Social Change Project team undertakes a variety of research projects that seek to feed grounded theory into the development of policy.

Read about:

1) Combating Disability Discrimination by Regulation – Research Study

In an era where the development of accessibility standards legislation is becoming more widespread, this study aims to examine, explain and reflect on the law and the complexities of the processes used. This study will benefit the people with disabilities, the public, community leaders in the disability community, scholars of law and public administration, and government public policy makers in the creation of future regulatory regimes premised on the theory of deliberative democracy.

2) The Interplay Between Human Rights and Accessibility Laws: Lessons Learned and Considerations for the Planned Federal Accessibility Legislation

In this study, the author analyzes, comparatively, the administrative governance functions of legislation that provides accessibility standards in six jurisdictions that also offer legal protection from discrimination to people with disabilities:  Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Manitoba and Nova Scotia. 

3) Building the Relational Ethics of Health for Adults with Disabilities using the Lynchpin of Capacity Hearings

Adults with disabilities are often determined to have diminished legal capacity and correspondingly, have substitute decision makers appointed to make health, financial, or legal decisions on their behalf. However, we believe the legal capacity of adults with disabilities has too often been assessed too simplistically.

4) Critical Op-Eds & Student Research

Sharing reflections on current events relating to law, disability and social change through the perspective of critical disability theory. By students in Windsor Law’s Law, Disability & Social Change seminar, fall semester, 2015 and other Windsor Law students interested in promoting an inclusive society.