Suspects With Disabilities: ADA Title II, Arrests, and Reasonable Accommodations

By Keith Hiatt, PhD Candidate, Berkeley Law

On Thursday, January 22, 2015, at approximately 6:30 PM, a seventeen-year-old woman walked into a police station in Longview, Texas. By 7:00 PM, she was dead, shot multiple times by police officers. The young woman had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. We don’t know why she walked into the police station, or why she asked to speak to an officer. We don’t know why she told them she had a gun, when in reality she did not. We don’t know why she struggled with the officers, but we know that three officers physically subdued her. We don’t know why she fought with them and eventually pulled a knife, but we know that they reacted, almost instantly, by shooting her multiple times. We don’t know why. But we know that this is a scenario that plays itself out over and over. Continue reading “Suspects With Disabilities: ADA Title II, Arrests, and Reasonable Accommodations”

Symposium: Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States

Symposium: Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States

Click here to Watch Symposium Video

Click here to Read Symposium Papers

Berkeley Law, December 5, 2014

Summary by Chandima Karunanayaka (JD/MSW Candidate 2016)
& Stephanie Skinner (MSW/JD Candidate 2015)
Disability Legal Studies Fellows 2014-2015, Windsor Law, Canada

Introduction

The much-anticipated conference, Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States took place on December 5, 2014. Academics, advocates and students flew in from across Canada and the United States to share ideas and develop networks. Yet, most importantly, the conference was an opportunity for likeminded individuals to discuss, develop and challenge one another’s ideas on what is needed to achieve equality for people with disabilities in society. In her opening remarks, Prof. Laverne Jacobs identified the goal of the conference as exploring disability legal studies or the “disability angles” of the law. Over the course of the day, it seems that no stone was left unturned: discussion took place regarding international human rights law, social & economic rights, and processes & procedures for achieving equality. Lastly, we heard from current practitioners in the legal disability rights field. Overall, the conference was a great success and reinvigorated attendees to continue the battle they had begun. Below is a summary of the panels but note that more information about the conference along with a video may be obtained on the conference website:  https://www.law.berkeley.edu/17483.htm Continue reading “Symposium: Exploring Law, Disability and the Challenge of Equality in Canada and the United States”

Stott v Thomas Cook Tour Operators: Human Rights Left without a Remedy?

By Laverne Jacobs (Associate Professor, Windsor Law)
and Chandima Karunanayaka (JD/MSW Candidate ’16)

Mr. Stott was a passenger with a mobility limitation. He was a permanent wheelchair user and paralyzed from the shoulders down. In 2008, he and his wife booked a return flight through Thomas Cook Tour Operators.  Due to his physical condition, Mr. Stott requested at the time of booking that his wife be seated next to him as she assisted with his personal care during flights. The airline reassured him that this request would be honoured. The outbound flight passed without incident. However, the request was not complied with on the return flight. At check-in, when Mr. Stott was told that his wife would not be seated next to him, the crew informed him that the matter would be resolved at the gate. But, at the gate, Mr. Stott was told that passengers had already boarded the aircraft and no other arrangements could be made. The airline made no attempt to ask nearby passengers to relocate to accommodate Mr. Stott. Continue reading “Stott v Thomas Cook Tour Operators: Human Rights Left without a Remedy?”